Close Corporate Tax Loopholes

Across the country, some of the nation’s most prosperous people and companies — including GE, Google and Goldman Sachs — have avoided paying the taxes they owe, costing taxpayers $150 billion just last year.

TAX HAVENS COST US $150 BILLION A YEAR

No company should be able to game the tax system to avoid paying what it legitimately owes. And, yet, with atleast 83 of the nation's top 100 publicly traded companies establishing shell companies in offshore havens to avoid taxes, this is becoming more the rule than the exception. GE, Google, Goldman Sachs and dozens of others have created hundreds of phantom entities with nothing more than a clever tax attorney and P.O. box. 

Most recent academic studies estimate that about $150 billion in tax revenue is lost every year to offshore tax havens. The result? Cuts to public services, additional taxes today or additional debt to be paid by the next generation. 

It’s not illegal, but it’s not right.

Meanwhile . . . the average taxpayer paid $1,026 more to cover the billions that GE and others skipped out on last year, companies that don’t use these schemes keep struggling to compete with those that do, and state legislatures and Congress are considering deep cuts for essential public programs — from education, to health care, to clean air and drinking water.

We're being asked to tighten our belts and make sacrifices while giving the tax haven crew a free ride. U.S. PIRG is pushing for commonsense changes that simply say that if corporations are based here and generate profits here, then they should, like all of us who earn income here, pay the taxes they owe.

Issue updates

Media Hit | Budget, Tax

Enriquez, Visco: Tax deduction benefits BP in blast settlement

Many companies deduct the cost of settlement payments for misdeeds like the Texas City disaster as an ordinary business expense.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Budget, Tax

Record-Breaking JPMorgan Settlement Contains Protections for Taxpayers

Now that the DOJ has protected taxpayers by addressing the tax deductibility of the penalties, U.S. PIRG is calling on the agency to be fully transparent as to why the remainder of the settlement is deductible.  If the remaining $11 billion is fully deducted, taxpayers deserve to know why they will end up picking up the tab for almost $4 billion in lost revenue.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Budget, Tax

Baucus Corporate Tax Proposal Closes Loopholes, but Leaves Incentives to Shift Profits to Offshore Tax Havens

 

Statement of U.S. PIRG Tax and Budget Advocate Dan Smith on Senate Finance Committee corporate tax reform discussion draft.

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Media Hit | Budget, Tax

JPMorgan Settlement Truth in Advertising Sought on Taxes

An aspect of U.S. tax law is being criticized by some lawmakers and consumer groups concerned that it may be worth billions of dollars for JPMorgan Chase & Co in negotiations with the Department of Justice.

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Media Hit | Tax

Senate bill targets corporations that deduct settlement payouts

JPMorgan Chase’s pending $13 billion settlement with the Justice Department has revived calls from some in Congress that corporations should be prevented from claiming tax deductions on such deals.

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Media Hit | Tax

JPMorgan pact draws fire

The $13 billion settlement with JPMorgan Chase is drawing some bipartisan fire in Congress where lawmakers say it could leave taxpayers on the hook.

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Media Hit | Tax

Tax Breaks for Corporate Wrongdoing, Part 1: The FTC

The Federal Trade Commission should be set up to ensure that corporate wrongdoers don't get a tax break for their misdeeds.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Tax

JPMorgan’s Tax-Deductible Settlement is Just the Tip of the Iceberg

The corporate practice of taking a tax deduction for settlement payments made to federal agencies is ubiquitous

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News Release | U.S. PIRG | Tax

JPMorgan Shouldn’t Get Tax Break for “London Whale” Settlement

JPMorgan could get a $35 million tax deduction from its $100 million settlement with Commodity Futures Trading Commission unless the regulator explicitly forbids it.

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Media Hit | Budget, Tax

Infrastructure Bill is Actually Giant Corporate Tax Break

Currently, many large corporations avoid taxes by booking profits to sham shell companies in offshore tax havens like the Cayman Islands. This offshore tax dodging costs Americans a whopping $90 billion each year in tax revenue.

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PRIORITY ACTION

Some of the nation’s most prosperous people and companies — including GE, Google and Goldman Sachs — avoid paying the taxes they owe, costing taxpayers $150 billion just last year.

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