Making Health Care Work Updates

Report | U.S. PIRG | Health Care

The Cost of Repeal for Young Adults

Before moving forward with the health care repeal, however, policy-makers must consider the real-life consequences that their policy choices would have on millions of young Americans. U.S. PIRG has examined official research, data, and projections from independent sources, to provide a detailed picture of repeal’s impact on young adults. The evidence reveals that young people would face significant costs if the Affordable Care Act is repealed.

Report | U.S. PIRG | Health Care

The Cost of Repeal

The evidence suggests that the costs of health care repeal are substantial and many of the asserted benefits of repeal do not stand up under scrutiny. But policy makers have additional options. They instead should work to implement the law properly in the states and take the steps to lower health care costs which the federal law fails to take.

Report | U.S. PIRG | Health Care

MAINE: The Cost of Repeal

The evidence suggests that the costs of health care repeal are substantial and many of the asserted benefits of repeal do not stand up under scrutiny. But Maine's policy makers have additional options. Maine instead should adapt the law's implementation to its needs and take the steps to lower health care costs which the federal law fails to take.

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Health Care

Delivering on the Promise

The recently passed federal health care reform law will make significant changes in how health insurance and health care work for consumers, businesses, and local and state governments, as well as how insurers and providers operate. But whether Americans experience improved care, lower costs and greater access depends largely on what happens next. 

Report | U.S. PIRG | Health Care

Uncovered

It's commonly assumed that young Americans are disengaged from the issue, that on the whole they are a healthy group who are unlikely to be affected by health problems or lack access to care. But the reality couldn't be more different. In fact, young people, including college students, are on the front lines of the health care crisis. They make up the largest age block of the uninsured, and face a uniquely challenging set of obstacles that often prevent them from getting coverage.

Report | U.S. PIRG | Health Care

The Three Trillion Dollar Question

Without health care reform, the United States is projected to spend over $40 trillion on health care in the next decade.  Experts estimate that thirty percent of that spending – up to $12 trillion dollars – will be wasted on ineffective care, pointless red tape, and counterproductive treatments that can actually harm patients.  

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Health Care

The Small Business Dilemma

To more accurately reflect the diversity of views of small businesses on health care, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group has let small business owners to speak for themselves. Three hundred and forty-three small business owners and managers across the country made their views heard through a survey which investigated the impact of health care costs on their businesses.

Report | CALPIRG Education Fund | Health Care

Cutting Red Tape In Health Care

California’s health care system is broken. Costs are rising faster than either inflation or wages, and wasteful spending is a major culprit. Inefficient and duplicative administrative systems force doctors and hospitals to spend more time and money on administrative support than is necessary, which increases costs to patients. However, by following the example of other states and streamlining key processes—such as insurance billing and payment and physician credentialing at hospitals—providers and payers in California can collectively save hundreds of millions of dollars annually and help lower the cost of health care.

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Health Care

The Facts about Comparative Effectiveness Research

As Congressional and public debate over health care reform grows more intense, comparative effectiveness research (CER) has emerged as an unlikely flashpoint of controversy. Opponents’ claims that CER results in the rationing of health care or a government takeover are belied by the true nature of such research: it is simply fundamental scientific research of medical treatments aimed at determining the most effective ways to treat sickness and injury. CER is the basis of all advancements in the field of medical science and has been used throughout history to improve medical treatment. The results of such research are used to create treatment guidelines, which are then incorporated by physicians in determining the best course of care for each individual patient.

Report | U.S. PIRG Education Fund | Health Care

More Bang for the Health Care Buck

The high cost of health care in the U.S. imposes an increasing burden on households, businesses, government, and our country’s economy – a burden made heavier by the current economic crisis. The money that insurance companies spend on inefficient administration, billing and marketing – instead of medical care for their enrollees – contributes to the high health care costs Americans must endure. To incentive efficiency and get costs under control, the U.S. should require health plans and insurers to spend at least 85 percent of revenue on health care.  Almost half of the nation’s health plans and insurers we surveyed already meet this efficiency standard, while a similar number could comply with the standard with only moderate effort.

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