Updates

Has Congress Forgotten Enron, Dutch Tulip Bubble Scandals?

By | Ed Mierzwinski
Consumer Program Director

A misnamed package of legislation to weaken investor protection laws -- the so-called Jobs Act -- is speeding through the House this week. While some Senators are for parts of the package, the Senate is taking a closer look at whether rolling back the landmark investor protections known as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act enacted after the Enron and related accounting scandals is really the way to go.

A new WashingtonPost-ABC News poll shows that on Super Tuesday, those going to cast their ballots in the presidential primary are not particularly enthusiastic about any of the candidates. Why? There is a fundamental problem that explains much of the disconnect between the candidates and the rank-and-file voters: the fact is, voters did not choose these candidates -- donors did.

It has become clear over the course of this primary season that a candidate's super PAC's prowess in knocking down the competition is key to staying in the race. Yet a recent U.S.PIRG/Demos study found that of all itemized contributions to super PACs, 96% came in contributions of $10,000 or more from just 1,097 donors.

News Release | U.S. PIRG | Tax

New in The Huffington Post: Will BP’s Misdeeds Be Further Subsidized by Taxpayers?

New In the Public Interest column today on The Huffington Post from Phineas Baxandall

U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG) Senior Analyst on Tax and Budget Policy explains the hidden tax subsidy likely to be in a settlement unless it’s prohibited

News Release | U.S. PIRG | Public Health

Food Inspections: Are They Being Tackled Effectively to Combat Food-Borne Pathogens?

It is time that the USDA and the FDA modernize their food safety procedures to better protect us from the real hazards in food: deadly pathogens and microbial contaminants in our meats and fresh produce.

Some interesting consumer news of the week, in case you missed it

By | Ed Mierzwinski
Consumer Program Director

An occasional update featuring important consumer stories you may have missed this week. This week, Occupy Wall Street joins clarion call for CFPB to reform the credit bureaus...Leading consumer columnist Michelle Singletary calls Google's practices "creepy"...Massachusetts official says "take state's money out of banks that don't comply with state laws requiring free accounts for young/old...FCC wants comment on cellphone shutdowns that affect First Amendment rights...and more.

B of A tests new fees, CFPB asks for your checking account complaints

By | Ed Mierzwinski
Consumer Program Director

Reporters are calling about BofA's proposed new checking account fees, "Ed, what does it mean?" Meanwhile the CFPB says checking accounts can be "complex and confusing" and announced it is now  ready and waiting for your checking account complaints. Find out more.

Apple Juice Act will take out Arsenic and Lead in Juice

By | Nasima Hossain
Public Health Advocate

A Consumer Reports investigation revealed that many brands of apple juice currently on the market contain dangerously high levels of arsenic and lead and a bill has been introduced to make apple juice safe.

Funding Cuts for Testing of Deadly Bacteria in Fresh Produce

By | Nasima Hossain
Public Health Advocate

The USDA budget would eliminate the nation’s only program that regularly tests fruits and vegetables for deadly pathogens. Cutting this program will leave public health officials without a crucial tool used to investigate deadly foodborne illnesses and to speed up recalls of dangerous fresh produce.

News Release | U.S. PIRG | Budget

Facebook’s Tax Dodge Stands to Make Billions for Company and Zuckerberg

U.S. Senator Carl Levin isn’t necessarily the man you’d look to for the latest news about Facebook. The 77-year old was described by Time magazine as “pudgy, balding and occasionally rumpled, and he constantly wears his glasses at the very tip of his nose.” However, today he broke some shocking news on the Senate floor about special tax favors that Facebook and its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, will enjoy at great cost to the U.S. Treasury.

As web giants amass more and more information about consumers for behavioral targeting and even "social discrimination" -- which can include differential pricing for the same product or the use of web tracking data and falsely-flagged websites to promote certain brandname drug use -- the White House has called for a privacy bill of rights. Companies and powerful industry lobbies seeking to keep those rights weak have rolled out their own "Do Not Track Sometimes" button. Meanwhile bi-partisan groups of Congressional privacy hawks and, now, state attorneys general have demanded information from Google about its slippery, ever-changing privacy policies and whether Googleis in compliance with settlements it has already agreed to.

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