Blog Posts By:

Alex Truelove,
Director, Zero Waste Campaign

A coastal city takes action to reduce the most common sources of disposable plastic waste

Cities and states around the country have taken steps to ban certain single-use plastics -- straws, plastic bags, polystyrene take-out containers and more. These policies are aimed at reducing the flow of plastic into our waterways and the waste stream. But do they work? 

Guest post by Clay Napurano

Cities and states around the country have taken steps to ban certain single-use plastics -- straws, plastic bags, polystyrene take-out containers and more. These policies are aimed at reducing the flow of plastic into our waterways and the waste stream. But do they work? 

In this blog series, we present four examples of single-use plastics bans that are reducing plastic pollution.

Guest post by Clay Napurano

Cities and states around the country have taken steps to ban certain single-use plastics -- straws, plastic bags, polystyrene take-out containers and more. These policies are aimed at reducing the flow of plastic into our waterways and the waste stream. But do they work? 

In this blog series, we present four examples of single-use plastics bans that are reducing plastic pollution. 

This blog post was guest written by Joshua Gregory

One thing that often gets overlooked at cookouts is the sheer amount of waste that these events create. By being conscious and taking a few extra steps when planning a cookout, we can all reduce the amount of waste we create, and in many ways, have better cookouts than before. Here’s how I did it, and how you can too:

The COVID-19 pandemic has interrupted and changed our lives in countless ways. Some of those changes have challenged our ability to handle and reduce our waste. Some changes have presented new opportunities. Here are some of the results, both good and bad:

Our country has a waste problem. It's time for new solutions and a renewed commitment to move toward zero waste. PIRG and Environment America's advocates, organizers and members are promoting ways to reduce what we consume, reuse what we can, and recycle the rest.

Extended producer responsibility is the first step.

This product is certified compostable. Increasingly, this phrase is appearing on a variety of everyday goods -- from paper coffee cups and plastic forks to molded pulp packaging.

On holidays, most of us like to shop or grill or visit grandma or the in-laws. There’s nothing wrong with that. But it’s good for our souls to take a moment to remember the meaning of each holiday. Consider Earth Day.