Blog Posts By:

Gideon Weissman,
Policy Analyst, Frontier Group

Data from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) can shed some light on just which financial issues consumers have been most affected by during the pandemic, offering clues on what kinds of help American need to get through the coming months.

By responding to this urgent need for change, we can make consumers better off not just for the pandemic, but also in the years to come.

Many plans for building new highways are absurd. But do we miss something important by limiting our conversation about “highway boondoggles” to new highway capacity?

Mortgage servicers failed Americans during the last recession. And if early data from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is any indication, history may well be on its way to repeating.

Tens of millions of Americans with mortgages have been put in a tough spot by the coronavirus crisis. Many more consumers will likely seek forbearance or loan modifications in the weeks and months ahead.

Consumers right now face unprecedented vulnerability - and they need an unprecedented level of protection, including from the top cop on the financial beat, the CFPB.

More than 44 million Americans have student loan debt, in total owing more than $1.4 trillion. Finding the right student loan and deciding on the right payment plan can be complicated. Many borrowers also have trouble paying – more than 10 percent of student loans are at least 90 days delinquent. Fortunately, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) – America’s first federal agency dedicated to protecting Americans in the financial marketplace – has resources to help.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was created in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis with one mission: to protect consumers in the financial marketplace. But how exactly is it protecting consumers from mistreatment? We explain.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is the first federal agency devoted to protecting consumers in the financial marketplace. In 2016, the CFPB held Wells Fargo accountable for unfair treatment of its customers.