Blog Posts By:

Matt Casale,
Director, Environment Campaigns

Over the last four months, while the COVID pandemic has occupied the forefront of the American public’s consciousness, the Trump administration has indefinitely suspended a series of EPA regulatory activities and undone a collection of crucial environmental protections.

The CDC recently released new guidelines for employers in the wake of COVID-19 and there are some problems with its transportation-related recommendations.

Cities across the country, looking to meet climate goals, reduce air pollution and alleviate congestion, are trying to find ways increase public transportation ridership. One idea many are exploring: ditching fares. Kansas City, Mo., is the first to do so. Here's how it's going so far.

Closing streets (or parts of streets) to non-necessary cars on some routes around grocery stores, pharmacies, hospitals and other essential locations can help make travel safer during a time of necessary physical distancing. It will also create safe passages for people to walk and bike, which may also help reduce crowding in parks and on trails, where people have been congregating in an attempt to get outside and get exercise during quarantine.

In 2019, Norway's capital city of Oslo experienced zero deaths on its roads. In 2020, American cities should resolve to take the steps to end roadway deaths as well. 

Along with the Zero Emission Bus Coalition -- a collective of environmental, transit, labor, community, and public health organizations dedicated to accelerating the electrification of public transit - we delivered this letter to Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, Secretary of Transportation Stephanie Pollack and the Chairman of the MBTA’s Fiscal Management and Control Board, Joseph Aiello calling for a clear commitment to transition the MBTA to all-electric buses. 

What’s worse than building a new highway to an airport? Building a new highway to an airport that doesn’t exist.

Walkers and bikers are getting killed at alarming rates -- at a time when we need this type of transportation more than ever. 

Cities across the country are rolling out electric buses. What can we learn from their early experiences?

Last week, Amazon, the online retail and delivery giant, announced plans to purchase 100,000 electric delivery vans to go into service between 2021 and 2024.