Blog Posts By:

Matt Wellington,
Director, Public Health Campaigns

Few people living today remember what it was like to live through a world war, but that’s what we’re in, and we’re going to have to sacrifice if we want to save ourselves and each other. Just as the greatest generation did, we need to step up to what history has delivered.

Health professionals still don't have adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) to keep themselves safe while they save lives. That's why we're calling for central, transparent coordination of the medical supply chain during the COVID-19 crisis. 

The emergence and spread of the novel coronavirus pandemic is a symptom of how we raise food animals across the world. 

Without adequate testing for the novel coronavirus, health professionals are in the dark. We are calling on Adm. Brett Giroir, who is the Assistant Secretary for Health and the federal point person for COVID-19 testing response, to immediately adopt and follow through on a plan to make sure that everyone who needs a test, gets a test. 

Today, the Oversight Subcommittee of the Energy and Commerce Committee -- the very Committee that dramatically and finally exposed tobacco companies’ ploys to deceive smokers back in 1994 -- is taking on the tobacco threat 2.0 with a hearing about the public health risks of e-cigarettes. Subcommittee Chair Diana DeGette (D-CO) submitted U.S. PIRG's blog on the youth vaping epidemic into the official record of the hearing. 

We shouldn’t be raising food in ways that put tens of thousands of people’s lives at risk — that’s why we’re getting commitments from major restaurant chains to stop serving meat raised on routine antibiotics.

When it comes to our food, most of us want to know how it’s produced, and where it comes from. Buzzwords such as all natural, free-range, superfood often leave us wondering what to focus in on and what food fads to simply tune out. But as trends have come and gone, antibiotic use on farms has remained a looming threat for decades. That’s why the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility, a coalition of investors, recently filed shareholder resolutions on McDonald’s, along with Denny’s and Sanderson Farms, to restrict the use of medically important antibiotics in their meat supply chains.

More than half of the top 25 restaurant chains (14 to be exact) in the U.S. have taken some action to restrict the routine use of antibiotics in their meat supply chains, up from 9 just one year ago. Combined, these fourteen restaurants account for a whopping two-thirds of all fast food industry revenue.

Last week another major restaurant took action to protect antibiotics, and a major laggard in the meat industry received a much-needed reality check.

Even in the best of times, positive social change can be hard to come by. That is why the latest victory for consumers and our health is such welcome news.