Blog Posts By:

Mike Litt,
Director, Campaign to Defend the Consumer Bureau

Most airlines are only offering vouchers, not refunds, when passengers cancel their flights due to concerns about COVID-19.

U.S. PIRG's Consumer Campaign Director, Mike Litt, was invited to testify at a Congressional hearing yesterday about improving data security at the credit bureaus. Here are his opening remarks. 

Our consumer campaign director provides an update to how you can change your Experian credit freeze PIN after a security flaw was discovered two weeks ago.

Today, we're releasing our revamped Identity Theft and Online Privacy resources.

Today, we sent a letter to all members of the House of Representatives in opposition to S.2155, which is expected to come up for a vote this afternoon. This bill, which we call the Bank Lobbyist Act, is the biggest roll-back of Wall Street Reform protections for mortgage borrowers and our economy since the economic crash 10 years ago. It also provides breaks for Equifax and the other national credit bureaus. In addition to our letter, we also delivered petition signatures from over 12,600 of our members across the country in opposition to S. 2155's credit bureau related problems. 

Today, we sent a letter to FHFA Director Mel Watt on behalf of 77 organizations, ahead of his hearing before Congress and an expected vote on S.2155 in the House this week. 

Today, we sent a letter addressed to all members of the House of Represenatives in opposition to S. 2155, or as we call it, the Bank Lobbyist Act. We are joined by 84 other groups and leaders, representing communities, consumers, servicemember, and workers across the country. In particular, this letter explains how the bill benefits Equifax and the other national credit bureaus at the expense of average consumers and our military servciemembers. 

Our op-ed in CNN today dives into how the bad banking bill (S. 2155) in Congress also benefits Equifax & the other credit bureaus at the expense of average consumers and servicemembers.

Some 32 Democratic and Republican state Attorneys General have sent a strong letter to the bi-partisan sponsors of a draft federal data breach and data security bill. The weak, industry-backed proposal from Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO) and Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) would override, or preempt, numerous better state privacy laws and, importantly, prevent states from ever again acting to protect their citizens' financial DNA better. We don't like the bill either.

Why would we support an amendment to make a bad bill worse? We wouldn't. Here's our explainer on how our signature on a 2014 letter should not have been used to somehow imply we supported an amendment to S2155 on credit scoring favoring Equifax and the other Big 3 credit bureaus.